Cherubim or CherubsImage result for cherubim spiritual meaning

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A cherub (/ˈtʃɛrəb/;also pl. cherubim; Hebrew כְּרוּב, pl. כְּרוּבִים, English trans kərūv, pl. kərūvîm, dual kərūvāyim; Latin cherub, pl.cherubin, cherubim; Syriac ܟܪܘܒܐ) is a winged angelic being who is considered to attend on the Abrahamic God in biblical tradition. The concept is represented in ancient Middle Eastern art as a lion or bull with eagles’ wings and a human face, and regarded in traditionalChristian angelology as an angel of the second highest order of the ninefold celestial hierarchy. Cherubim are mentioned throughout the Hebrew Bible and once in the New Testament in reference to the mercy seat of the Ark of the Covenant.Cherubim/cherubs are angelic beings involved in the worship and praise of God. The cherubim are first mentioned in the Bible in Genesis 3:24, “After He drove the man out, He placed on the east side of the Garden of Eden cherubim and a flaming sword flashing back and forth to guard the way to the tree of life.” Prior to his rebellion, Satan was a cherub (Ezekiel 28:12-15). The tabernacle and temple along with their articles contained many representations of cherubim (Exodus 25:17-22; 26:1, 31; 36:8; 1 Kings 6:23-35; 7:29-36; 8:6-7; 1 Chronicles 28:18; 2 Chronicles 3:7-14; 2 Chronicles 3:10-13; 5:7-8; Hebrews 9:5).
Chapters 1 and 10 of the book of Ezekiel describe the “four living creatures” (Ezekiel 1:5) as the same beings as the cherubim (Ezekiel 10). Αποτέλεσμα εικόνας για Cherubim or CherubsEach had four faces—that of a man, a lion, an ox, and an eagle (Ezekiel 1:10; also 10:14)—and each had four wings. In their appearance, the cherubim “had the likeness of a man” (Ezekiel 1:5). These cherubim used two of their wings for flying and the other two for covering their bodies (Ezekiel 1:6, 11, 23). Under their wings the cherubim appeared to have the form, or likeness, of a man’s hand (Ezekiel 1:8; 10:7-8, 21).
The imagery of Revelation 4:6-9 also seems to be describing cherubim. The cherubim serve the purpose of magnifying the holiness and power of God. This is one of their main responsibilities throughout the Bible. In addition to singing God’s praises, they also serve as a visible reminder of the majesty and glory of God and His abiding presence with His people.

Cherubim/cherubs are angelic beings involved in the worship and praise of God. The cherubim are first mentioned in the Bible in Genesis 3:24, “After He drove the man out, He placed on the east side of the Garden of Eden cherubim and a flaming sword flashing back and forth to guard the way to the tree of life.” Prior to his rebellion, Satan was a cherub (Ezekiel 28:12-15). The tabernacle and temple along with their articles contained many representations of cherubim.

Cherubim are angelic beings that are described in biblical tradition as attending on God. In traditional Christian angelology, they are considered to be of the second highest order in the celestial hierarchy. Standing only below the Seraphim Angels in closeness to God, they exude power and inspire awe. Their illuminative knowledge and wisdom are said to be incomprehensible to the human mind. Cherubim are a word of Hebrew origin that means “fullness of knowledge”.

Angel Hierarchy

The nine orders of Angels listed in order of rank are: Seraphim, Cherubim, Thrones, Dominations, Virtues, Powers, Principalities, Archangels and Angels. They make up 3 Triads with 3 choirs in each Triad. Cherubim are in the Second Choir of the First Triad, with Seraphim being the First Choir.

Yeshuah haMashiach-Jesus ChristThe two cherubim placed by God at the entrance of paradise (Gen. iii. 24) were angels created on the third day, and therefore they had no definite shape; appearing either as men or women, or as spirits or angelic beings (Genesis Rabbah xxi., end).In Genesis 3:24 the cherubim are placed by God, after the expulsion of Adam from the garden of Eden, at the east thereof, together with the flaming sword “to keep the way of the tree of life.” In their function as guardians of Paradise the cherubim bear an analogy to the winged bulls and lions of Babylonia and Assyria, colossal figures with human faces standing guard at the entrance of temples (and palaces), just as in Egypt the approaches to the sanctuaries are guarded by sphinxes. But the Babylonian colossi go by the name of lamassu, or shedu; no designation at all approaching the Hebrew kerubh has so far been found in the Assyrian language. Nor are thus named the winged figures, half human and half animal, which in Babylonian and Persian art are found on both sides of the “sacred tree.” Thus, a Babylonian origin of the Hebrew cherubim is neither proved nor disproved. If we look for further analogies which, of course, do not indicate a borrowing on the part of the Hebrews, we may mention the fabulous griffins (grupes), usually represented as having the heads and wings of an eagle and the body and hind quarters of a lion; they were believed by the Greeks to inhabit Scythia, and to keep jealous watch over the gold of that country.

Cherubim Virtues and Vocations

Cherubim angels symbolize harmony and wisdom. They are guardians of the Light and the stars, and channel positive energy from the Divine throughout the cosmos

Cherubim possess boundless love, knowledge and wisdom, while bestowing Divine protection. They act as heavenly counselors and are seekers of the eternal Truth.

The Cherubim are also the masters and guardians of vibration and energy in the cosmos. When All There Is, in the center of the cosmos, sends out vibrations, it is the Cherubim that watch over them as they travel around the cosmos delivering messages from All There Is and collecting information and experiences to be brought back to All There Is. This undertaking is critical for the functioning of the cosmos. Without this service from the Cherubim, there would be no vibration in the world.

It is believed that the Cherubim manage all the records of God’s creative powers, which are contained in the Akashic Records. The Akashic Records also contain the details of all the journeys of all souls in the cosmos. The Akashic Records that are located in the center of the cosmos can only be “read” by a Cherubim Angel. There are lower levels of the Akashic Records, such as the planetary historical records that reside within Gaia (Mother Earth), which can be “read” by some humans who have developed the ability.

image4In the Midrash, an ancient commentary on Hebrews Scriptures, it says that when an man sleeps, his body tells the soul what it has done during the day, the soul reports this to the spirit, the spirit to the angel, the angel to the cherub, and the cherub to the seraph, who brings it before God.

As attendants of God, they bear the throne upon which He descends from His high abode. Thus in the description of a theophany in Psalms 18, we read: – “He bowed the heavens also, and came down; And thick darkness was under his feet. And he rode upon a cherub and did fly; Yea, he soared upon the wings of the wind.” (Psalms 18:9,10) + Hence, the Lord, or, as the fuller title goes, the Lord of Hosts, is repeatedly styled “He that sitteth (throned) above the cherubim” (Psalms 80:1; 99:1; 1 Samuel 4:4, and elsewhere). There is certainly no trace here of bull figures: bulls do not fly. The underlying conception is, it seems, rather that of the storm cloud. Compare Psalms 104:3: – “Who maketh the clouds his chariot; Who walketh upon the wings of the wind.” The Hebrew for “chariot” is rekhubh, a sort of inverted kerubh. + 5. In the Vision of Ezekiel.

But the function of the cherubim as bearers and movers of the Divine throne is brought out most clearly in the vision of Ezekiel (Ezekiel 1, with which compare Ezekiel 10). In chapter 1 the prophet designates them as “living creatures” (chayyoth); but upon hearing God’s words addressed to the “man clothed in linen” (Ezekiel 10:2) he perceives that the living creatures which he saw in the first vision were cherubim (Ezekiel 10:20); hence, in Ezekiel 9:3 the chariot or throne, from which the glory of God went up, is spoken of as a cherub. The following is a description in detail of the cherubim as seen by Ezekiel. They are represented as four living creatures, each with four faces, man, lion, ox (replaced in the parallel chapter by cherub), and eagle (Ezekiel 1:10; 10:14), having the figure and hands of men (Ezekiel 1:5,8), and the feet of calves (Ezekiel 1:7). Each has four wings, two of which are stretched upward (Ezekiel 1:11), meeting above and sustaining the “firmament,” that is, the bottom of the Divine throne (Ezekiel 1:22; 10:1), while two are stretched downward, conformable the one to the other, so as to cover their bodies (Ezekiel 1:11,23). In appearance, the living creatures resemble coals of fire (compare Ezekiel 10:2,6, where the “man clothed in linen” is bidden fill both his hands with coals of fire from between the cherubim), burning like torches, the fire flashing up and down among the creatures, a bright fire out of which lightning goes forth (Ezekiel 1:13). Thus the creatures run and vanish as the appearance of a flash of lightning (Ezekiel 1:14). The cherubim do not turn as they change direction, but always go straight forward (Ezekiel 1:9,17; 10:11), as do the wheels of the cherubic chariot with rings full of eyes round about (Ezekiel 1:18; 10:12). The cherubim represent the spirit, or will, in the wheels: at the direction of the spirit, the wheels are lifted up from the bottom and the chariot moves upward (Ezekiel 1:19; 10:16). The cherubim are thus the moving force of the vehicle.

Cherubim in Lore

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According to Islamic lore, Cherubim were created from Archangel Michael’s tears, which were shed for the sins of humanity, while in occult lore Cherubim have the responsibility of driving God’s chariot, a key symbol of heaven. The chariot is symbolic of self-discipline, triumph achieved through effort and by removing obstacles, and the vision to move forward. It is interesting to note here that the Hebrew word “Merkabah” also means chariot and is used in the book of Ezekiel for the four-wheeled chariot of God, which of course have Cherubim at the reins.

Throughout Christian and Hebrew writings, Cherubim are depicted as a type of spiritual being that is usually associated with the presence of God. In the Bible, for example, Cherubim appear to magnify the holiness and power of God, which is seen as one of their main responsibilities. They sing God’s praises and serve as a visible reminder of God’s majesty, glory and His perpetual presence with all of His creation.

Akashic Records that are located in the center of the cosmos can only be “read” by a Cherubim Angel. There are lower levels of the Akashic Records, such as the planetary historical records that reside within Gaia (Mother Earth), which can be “read” by some humans who have developed the ability.

In the Midrash, an ancient commentary on Hebrews Scriptures, it says that when an man sleeps, his body tells the soul what it has done during the day, the soul reports this to the spirit, the spirit to the angel, the angel to the cherub, and the cherub to the seraph, who brings it before God.

Ezekiel’s cherubim are clearly related to the seraphim in Isaiah’s inaugural vision (Isaiah 6). Like the cherubim, the seraphim are the attendants on God as He is seated upon a throne high and exalted; they are also winged creatures:

with twain they cover their faces, and with twain they cover their feet, and with twain they fly. Like the Levites in the sanctuary below, they sing a hymn of adoration: “Holy, holy, holy, is Yahweh of hosts: the whole earth is full of his glory.” In the Book of Enoch, the cherubim, seraphim, and ophannim (wheels), and all the angels of power constitute the “host of God,” the guardians of His throne, the singers of praise ascribing blessedness to “the Lord of Spirits,” with the archangel Gabriel at their head (see Isaiah 61:10;). Image result for cherubim spiritual meaning

And so in the Jewish daily liturgy the seraphim, ophannim, and “living creatures” constitute the heavenly choir who, the elect ministers of the Living God, ready to do the will of their maker with trembling, intone in sweet harmony the Thrice-holy. In the Talmud, the cherubim are represented as having the likeness of youths (with a fanciful etymology, ke plus rubh, “like a youth”; Cukk 5b; Chag 13b), while, according to the Midrash, they have no definite shape, but appear indifferently as men or women, or as spirits and angelic beings (Ge rabba’ 21).

 

Ezekiel 1:4-10 “As I looked, behold, a stormy wind came out of the north, and a great cloud, with brightness round about it, and fire flashing forth continually, and in the midst of it came the likeness of four living creatures. And this was their appearance: they had the form of men, but each had four faces, and each of them had four wings. Their legs were straight, and the soles of their feet were like the sole of a calf’s foot; and they sparkled like burnished bronze. Under their wings on their four sides they had human hands. And the four had their faces and their wings thus: their wings touched one another; they went every one straight forward, without turning as they went. As for the likeness of their faces, each had the face of a man in front; the four had the face of a lion on the right side, the four had the face of an ox on the left side, and the four had the face of an eagle at the back…. And the living creatures darted to and fro, like a flash of lightning.”

In Chapter 4 of Revelations, the verses 6-9 are believed to be describing Cherubim, as the description is similar to that in Ezekiel. These Cherubim are situated around a heavenly throne and are singing glory, honor and praise to the One on the throne.

A Few of the Better Known Cherubim Angels

Αποτέλεσμα εικόνας για Gabriel,Yophiel and raphaelGabriel, meaning “God is my strength” or “hero of God”, is the angel of incarnation, conception, birth, mercy and dreams. He is most often remembered as the messenger of impending births, such as to Mary and Zacharias in the Bible. Gabriel has been accredited as the angel who selects souls from heaven to be birthed on Earth. During the nine months while the child is in utero, it is said that Gabriel instructs the child about everything he/she needs to know on Earth. However, just prior to birth, he silences the child by pressing his finger onto the child’s lips, producing the cleft below the nose. Most notably, he is the Governor of Eden and Ruler of the Cherubim. Shown as a richly attired majestic figure, Gabriel sits at the left hand of God. Sometimes he is shown wearing a crown and bearing a scepter, with his right hand extended in greeting.

Because Gabriel is deeply concerned about children’s welfare, the archangel mentors responsible and loving adults who wish to help the young. If you feel called to work with children in any capacity, please ask Gabriel to help you. Gabriel helps earthly messengers such as teach­ers, counsellors, writers, artists, and actors. This arch­angel acts like a Heavenly agent and manager who motivates you to polish your skills. Gabriel then opens the door of opportunity for you to work in your chosen career, and gives you a loving push through it if you hesitate. Gabriel’s halo is copper colored, like the angel’s symbolic trumpet. If you see flashes or sparkles of copper light, or if you find yourself suddenly attracted to this metal, this is a sign that you’re working with Archangel Gabriel.

Archangel Gabriel’s Color: Copper

Crystal or Gemstone: Copper

Astrological Sign: Cancer, the nurturing and hardworking parent

An Affirmation to Archangel Gabriel

“Archangel Gabriel, thank you for helping me parent my beloved child. Please watch over me and my little
one, ensuring our health and happiness.

Raphael   The name, Raphael, means “God has healed” or “the medicine of God”. Although he is of the Seraphim choir, Raphael has been credited as a member of the Cherubim, Dominations and Powers angel choirs, too. Raphael’s chief role has been as a healer. He is also considered the patron of knowledge and of the sciences, including medicine, as well as a protector of travelers. Often, he is seen carrying a pilgrim’s staff and is perceived to be charming and fun-loving.

Although Raphael isn’t named in the Bible, theologians believe he was the archangel who healed the infirm at the Bethesda pond described in the Gospels. He is also thought to be one of the three angels who visited the patriarch Abraham and his wife, Sarah, to help with their conception; as well as the angel who healed Abraham’s grandson Jacob’s wrestling injuries and who gave King Solomon his magical ring.

Archangel Raphael brings God’s healing light to Earth. He once told me in a meditation that rather than healing, his role consists of revealing the true healed bodies that God created for all of us. To Raphael, everyone is already healthy in spiritual truth.

When you ask Raphael to heal a condition, often the cure manifests instantly. The archangel was just waiting for you to give him permission to conduct his healing work.Sometimes people feel a gentle buzzing energy as Raphael is healing them; or they see green lights. But for others, Raphael’s healing is very subtle.Raphael can help you reduce or eliminate pain stemming from short-term and chronic conditions. Again, it’s a result of your asking for his help. In this way, you signal your permission for him to intervene.

Raphael also combines his healing and travel talents to assure that you stay well prior to and during your vacation.Archangel Raphael often works in tandem with Archangel Michael to clear away fear and stress, which are major factors affecting health. The more you work with these archangels, the more you’ll come to trust them.

Archangel Raphael’s Color: Emerald Green

Crystal or Gemstone: Emerald or Malachite

Astrological Sign: Oversees All

An Affirmation to Archangel Raphael

“Dear Archangel Raphael, please attend to [name of person] and help him/her be healthy, happy, and strong. Please guide me as to how I can help as well.”

Jophiel   It is written that Jophiel was the angel that drove Adam and Eve from the Garden of Eden and then guards the Tree of Life with a flaming sword to prevent their return. Jophiel means “Beauty of God” and is sometimes known as Zophiel. Jophiel is the patron of art and beauty. He can help with creativity, artistic pursuits, appreciation of beauty, thinking beautiful thoughts and living joyfully. Jophiel can also help you to awaken to a deeper understanding of yourself, connecting you to your higher self and Divine wisdom.

As the angel of beauty, Jophiel has a distinctly feminine energy. Her mission is to bring beauty to all aspects of life, including:

Thoughts – Archangel Jophiel can help you hold more positive viewpoints about your life, relationships, and circumstances.

Feelings – Filling your heart with warm feelings of gratitude and enjoyment.

Home and Office – Helping you reduce clutter and create a meaningful environment that’s conducive to work and relaxation.

Personal Self – Guiding you in all aspects of self-care, including beautifying yourself.

Archangel Jophiel can help you quickly shift from a negative to a positive mindset. She’s also wonderful to call upon to heal misunderstandings with other people. Jophiel casts a wide net with her ability to bring beauty to your life, including helping with hair, makeup, and wardrobe.

When you ask Jophiel to help you beautify your life, you may feel compelled to start donating or selling unwanted items. I affectionately and respectfully refer to Jophiel as the “Feng Shui Angel,” after the ancient Asian art of room arrangement. Jophiel knows how much an organized environment affects our energy levels, mood, sleep patterns, and even health.

Jophiel’s halo color is deep fuchsia, so if you begin to see flashes or sparkles of hot pink light or if you’re suddenly attracted to this color, it’s a sign that this archangel is with you.

Archangel Jophiel’s Color: Dark Pink

Crystal or Gemstone: Rubellite or Deep Pink Tourmaline

Astrological Sign: Libra, the lover of beauty and orderliness

An Affirmation to Archangel Jophiel

“Dear Archangel Jophiel, thank you for helping me beautify 

It is believed that for the most part, the Cherubim stay in the center of the cosmos with All There Is, except for pivotal times in history when they have come forth to assist in efforts to bring about a Golden Age on Earth. Cherubim today, as in previous attempts, are playing very important roles in the Ascension process in this lifetime. It is estimated that around 20,000 Cherubim are currently supporting Earth and humanity’s Ascension. Some are residing in the etheric, while others have chosen to incarnate on Earth. This attempt at bringing about a Golden Age is expected to be successful for many reasons, including that it has been decreed on many levels and many elements will be in the precise alignment needed to ensure its success. One of the elements is the Eye of Isis, which creates a direct path for specific energies to come to Earth from All There Is in the center of the cosmos. The Eye of Isis will open the doorway for possibilities and eliminates most of the interferences and a variety of ways. Many Cherubim are also empathic and are especially sensitive to the effects of vibration. Negative or lower vibrations can easily create uneasiness, a feeling of being overwhelmed, anxiety, depression, fear, etc., unless the Cherubim learned how to protect themselves from exposure to unpleasant energies.

Everything is made up of vibration, including, but not limited to, all living things, feelings, emotions, thoughts, words, light and sounds. Energy healers, herbalists, homeopaths, psychics, color and sound therapists, numerologists, artists, musicians, teachers, writers, dancers, environmentalists and hypnotists are just some of the individuals that work closely with vibration and just may be a Cherubim Angel.

It seems that the Cherubim Angels currently incarnated on Earth are some of first ones to awaken to their purpose in this lifetime, namely to assist humanity’s Ascension. Nevertheless, some may yet be unaware that they are Cherubim
Chapters 1 and 10 of the book of Ezekiel describe the “four living creatures” as the same beings as the cherubim. Each had four faces—that of a man, a lion, an ox, and an eagle and each had four wings. In their appearance, the cherubim “had the likeness of a man” These cherubim used two of their wings for flying and the other two for covering their bodies Under their wings the cherubim appeared to have the form, or likeness, of a man’s hand.
The imagery of Revelation 4:6-9 also seems to be describing cherubim. The cherubim serve the purpose of magnifying the holiness and power of God. This is one of their main responsibilities throughout the Bible. In addition to singing God’s praises, they also serve as a visible reminder of the majesty and glory of God and His abiding presence with His people.Related image

a winged angelic being described in biblical tradition as attending on God, represented in ancient Middle Eastern art as a lion or bull with eagles’ wings and a human face and regarded in traditional Christian angelology as an angel of the second highest order of the nine fold celestial hierarchy.

When most people think of Cherubs they’ll think of pudgy little baby-like creatures, with two little wings, which are rather cute. However, that’s not how the Bible describes them! Cherubs (the correct plural is Cherubim) are described in two books of the Bible, Genesis and Ezekiel (a Jewish prophet).

In Genesis they guard the Garden of Eden, following Adam and Eve’s banishment from the Garden, and are described holding flaming swords.

The prophet Ezekiel has a vivid vision of heaven where he sees many angelic beings. His description of the Cherubim is powerful – almost frightening .

Not your average cute little angel! These are powerful heavenly beings with four faces and four wings.

The Cherubim are also described in the construction of the ‘Ark of the Covenant’. (Yes, the one out of the Indiana Jones film!) The Ark was the dwelling place of God with the Israelites during their exodus in the desert.

The ark was placed in the Jewish Temple, when it was built in Jerusalem. The holy part of the Temple (where the ark was placed and where the highest alter was located) also featured statues of Cherubim.

In Ezekiel’s vision he also describes another type of angelic beings that seem to be associated with the Cherubim. Their description is even stranger, to our eyes.

Certainly an amazing scene. Ezekiel’s vision might seems strange, it might well be that human eyes and senses just can’t properly describe the wonder of heaven.

The Bible doesn’t say how many Cherubim there are, but we’re told that Ezekiel saw four – and there may be more than that! Their role is to guard God’s Holy domain and presence from any sin and corruption. They are sometime known as the throne angels as they are seen to be around the throne of God 7.

In Jewish folklore the ‘Throne Angels’ are known as Merkabah.

Having four faces on four sides of their heads and being arranged in a square, they can travel in any direction without having to turn.

The word Cherub may come from a term ‘to guard’ which would fit well with their role. Nowhere in the Bible are the Cherubim actually called angels!

So far from being cute, cuddly creatures, the Cherubim are the mighty and powerful guardians of God.
As Guardians of Paradise: In Genesis 3:24 the cherubim are placed by God, after the expulsion of Adam from the garden of Eden, at the east thereof, together with the flaming sword “to keep the way of the tree of life.” In their function as guardians of Paradise the cherubim bear an analogy to the winged bulls and lions of Babylonia and Assyria, colossal figures with human faces standing guard at the entrance of temples (and palaces), just as in Egypt the approaches to the sanctuaries are guarded by sphinxes. But the Babylonian colossi go by the name of lamassu, or shedu; no designation at all approaching the Hebrew cherub has so far been found in the Assyrian language. Nor are thus named the winged figures, half human and half animal, which in Babylonian and Persian art are found on both sides of the “sacred tree.” Thus, a Babylonian origin of the Hebrew cherubim is neither proved nor disproved. If we look for further analogies which, of course, do not indicate a borrowing on the part of the Hebrews, we may mention the fabulous griffins (grupes), usually represented as having the heads and wings of an eagle and the body and hind quarters of a lion; they were believed by the Greeks to inhabit Scythia, and to keep jealous watch over the gold of that country.

Αποτέλεσμα εικόνας για Archangel raphaelThe Garden as the Abode of the Gods: the Garden of Eden, the primeval abode of man, reveals itself as more than that: it was apparently the dwelling-place of God. In the polytheistic story of the creation of the world and early life of man, which, while in several respects analogous (compare Genesis 3:22), is devoid of the more spiritual notions of Hebraism, the garden was the abode of the gods who alone had access to the tree of life from the fruit of which they derived their immortality. Adam, before the fall, is conceived as a superhuman being; for while he is forbidden to taste of the fruit of the tree of knowledge, the way to immortality is open to him; for it is only after transgressing the Divine command that he merits death and becomes mortal. The choice of immortal innocence and mortal knowledge lay before him; he elected death with knowledge.

The Cherubim as Attendants of the Deity: The mythical elements of the Paradise story are still more patent in Ezekiel 28:13, where the fall of the king of Tyre is likened to that of primeval man. The garden is situated on a holy mountain of Elohim(= God to Ezekiel, but gods in the primitive source), the `mountain of assembly’ of Isaiah 14:13, high above the stars in the recesses of the North. It is a wonderful place, adorned with all manner of precious stones. There man, perfect from the day he was created, resplendent with beauty, excelling in wisdom, walks among the fiery stones, like a cherub with outstretched wings. The cherubs are apparently the attendants of the Deity, beauteous angels, of whom man was to be one: but he fell from glory and was hurled from the sanctuary which he had polluted. Some of the angelic attendants of the Deity within are placed in Genesis without, to do service as guardians of the unapproachable holy garden.

As Bearers of the Throne: As attendants of God, they bear the throne upon which He descends from His high abode. Thus in the description of a theophany in Psalm 18, we read: “He bowed the heavens also, and came down; and thick darkness was under his feet. And he rode upon a cherub and did fly; yea, he soared upon the wings of the wind.” Hence, the Lord, or, as the fuller title goes, the Lord of Hosts, is repeatedly styled “He that sited (throned) above the cherubim” (Psalm 80:1;Psalm 99:1 1 Samuel 4:4, and elsewhere). There is certainly no trace here of bull figures: bulls do not fly. The underlying conception is, it seems, rather that of the storm cloud. Compare Psalm 104:3: “Who maketh the clouds his chariot; who walked upon the wings of the wind.” The Hebrew for “chariot” is rekhubh, a sort of inverted kerubh. 5. In the Vision of Ezekiel:
Αποτέλεσμα εικόνας για archangel jophielBut the function of the cherubim as bearers and movers of the Divine throne is brought out most clearly in the vision of. In chapter 1 the prophet designates them as “living creatures” (chayyoth); but upon hearing God’s words addressed to the “man clothed in linen” he perceives that the living creatures which he saw in the first vision were cherubim (Ezekiel 10:20); hence, in Ezekiel 9:3 the chariot or throne, from which the glory of God went up, is spoken of as a cherub. The following is a description in detail of the cherubim as seen by Ezekiel.

They are represented as four living creatures, each with four faces, man, lion, ox (replaced in the parallel chapter by cherub), and eagle, having the figure and hands of men (Ezekiel 1:5, 8), and the feet of calves. Each has four wings, two of which are stretched upward (Ezekiel 1:11), meeting above and sustaining the “firmament,” that is, the bottom of the Divine throne, while two are stretched downward, conformable the one to the other, so as to cover their bodies. In appearance, the living creatures resemble coals of fire (compare Ezekiel 10:2, 6, where the “man clothed in linen” is bidden fill both his hands with coals of fire from between the cherubim), burning like torches, the fire flashing up and down among the creatures, a bright fire out of which lightning goes forth. Thus the creatures run and vanish as the appearance of a flash of lightning. The cherubim do not turn as they change direction, but always go straight forward, as do the wheels of the cherubic chariot with rings full of eyes round about. The cherubim represent the spirit, or will, in the wheels: at the direction of the spirit, the wheels are lifted up from the bottom and the chariot moves upward. The cherubim are thus the moving force of the vehicle.
Relation to Seraphim and Other Angels: Ezekiel’s cherubim are clearly related to the seraphim in Isaiah’s inaugural vision (Isaiah 6). Like the cherubim, the seraphim are the attendants on God as He is seated upon a throne high and exalted; they are also winged creatures: with twain they cover their faces, and with twain they cover their feet, and with twain they fly. Like the Levites in the sanctuary below, they sing a hymn of adoration: “Holy, holy, holy, is Yahweh of hosts: the whole earth is full of his glory.” In the Book of Enoch, the cherubim, seraphim, and ophannim (wheels), and all the angels of power constitute the “host of God,” the guardians of His throne, the singers of praise ascribing blessedness to “the Lord of Spirits,” with the archangel Gabriel at their head (see Isaiah 61:10). And so in the Jewish daily liturgy the seraphim, ophannim, and “living creatures” constitute the heavenly choir who, the elect ministers of the Living God, ready to do the will of their maker with trembling, intone in sweet harmony the Thrice-holy. In the Talmud, the cherubim are represented as having the likeness of youths (with a fanciful etymology, ke plus rubh, “like a youth”; Cukk 5b; Chag 13b), while, according to the Midrash, they have no definite shape, but appear indifferently as men or women, or as spirits and angelic beings (Genesis rabba’ 21).

image7In Revelation 4: The “four living creatures” of Revelation 4:6 are clearly modeled upon Ezekiel, with supplementary touches from Isaiah. Full of eyes before and behind, they are in the midst of the throne, and round about it. One resembles a lion, the other a calf, and the third a man, and the fourth a flying eagle. Each of the creatures has six wings. “They have no rest day and night, saying, Holy, holy, holy, is the Lord God, the Almighty, who was and who is and who is to come.”
Cherubim are a kind of angel created by God. They are powerful beings and are among those who were chosen by God not to fall in Satan’s rebellion. After Adam and Eve sinned, they were assigned to guard the Tree of Life in the Garden of Eden presumably so Adam and Eve would not re-enter. God instructed that images of the cherubim be constructed upon the Mercy Seat which was over the Ark of the Covenant in the Holy of Holies. God is enthroned above the cherubim as a reference to the Ark of the Covenant. Cherubim were constructed out of gold and olive wood as well as carved engravings and embroidered on the walls of the tabernacle (Exodus 26:136:8) and on the veil. They are described in Ezekiel 1:5-11 and carry out God’s purposes.

Gen. 3:24, “So He drove the man out; and at the east of the garden of Eden He stationed the cherubim, and the flaming sword which turned every direction, to guard the way to the tree of life.”

Exodus 25:18-20,  “And you shall make two cherubim of gold, make them of hammered work at the two ends of the mercy seat. 19 “And make one cherub at one end and one cherub at the other end; you shall make the cherubim of one piece with the mercy seat at its two ends. 20 “And the cherubim shall have their wings spread upward, covering the mercy seat with their wings and facing one another; the faces of the cherubim are to be turned toward the mercy seat.”

Heb. 9:5, “And above it were the cherubim of glory overshadowing the mercy seat; but of these things we cannot now speak in detail.”

image6A Cherub or Cherubim is a type of angel usually involved in sacred
work before God. They are generally described as winged creatures with feet and hands. The word(s) occurs over 90 times in the Old Testament and once in the New Testament at Heb. 9:5, “And above it were the cherubim of glory overshadowing the Mercy Seat; but of these things we cannot now speak in detail.” Apparently, there are different kinds of Cherubim. Two golden Cherubim are on the Mercy Seat. They were put in Eden “to guard the way of the tree of life,” An interested description of them is given in Ezekiel 1:5-11, “And within it there were figures resembling four living beings. And this was their appearance: they had human form. 6 Each of them had four faces and four wings. 7 And their legs were straight and their feet were like a calf’s hoof, and they gleamed like burnished bronze. 8 Under their wings on their four sides were human hands. As for the faces and wings of the four of them, 9 their wings touched one another; their faces did not turn when they moved, each went straight forward. 10 As for the form of their faces, each had the face of a man, all four had the face of a lion on the right and the face of a bull on the left, and all four had the face of an eagle . . . 13 In the midst of the living beings there was something that looked like burning coals of fire, like torches darting back and forth among the living beings. The fire was bright, and lightning was flashing from the fire. 14 And the living beings ran to and fro like bolts of lightning.”